Jessica S

Queer: A Graphic History by Meg-John Barker and Julia Scheele.

Queer: A Graphic History, is a book by cartoonist Julia Scheele and Activist-Academic Meg-John Barker. It is both complex and simple, informative and questioning, funny and deep. It even manages to make those like theorists Michel Foucault and Judith Butler easy to understand if you’ve struggled in the past to get by their terminology!

Menna Elfyn’s Bondo, Antonella Anedda’s Archipelago and Tatiana Shcherbina’s Life Without: Bilingual Poetry.

“Every act of communication is a miracle of translation.” 
― Ken Liu, The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories
Bloodaxe’s billingual poetry collections like Menna Elfyn’s Bondo, Antonella Anedda’s Archipelago and Tatiana Shcherbina’s Life Without  are works of wonder. Here is why you should give them a read.

Burned At The Stake-The Life of Mary Channing/The Yorkshire Witch-The Life and Trial of Mary Bateman by Summer Strevens.

The stories of Mary Channing and Mary Bateman are ones that have been silenced for hundreds of years. In these two fantastic biographies, Summer Strevens composes the first studies into both women since the post-execution salacious biographies used to tarnish and punish even their memory.

Bad Girls from History: Wicked or Misunderstood? By Dee Gordon.

Well-Behaved Women Rarely Make History. -Laurel Thatcher Ulrich And yet, it is obvious that they demand of women greater constancy than they themselves have, for they who claim to be of this strong and noble condition cannot refrain from a whole number of very great defects and sins, and not out of ignorance, either, but […]

Radium Girls: The Dark Story of America’s Shining Women by Kate Moore.

    Sisters Albina Maggia Larice, Amelie Mollie Maggia and Quinta Maggia Mcdonald , Edna Bolz Hussman, Eleanor Ella Eckert, Genevieve Smith and her sister Josephine Smith, Grace Fryer, Hazel Vincent Kuser, Helen Quinlan, Irene Corby la Porte, Irene Rudolph, Jane Jennie Stocker, Katherine Schaub, Mae Cubberley Canfield, Marguerite Carlough and her sister Sarah Carlough […]

Rational Passions: Women and Scholarship in Britain 1702-1870: A Reader edited by Felicia Gordon and Gina Luria Walker

Rational Passions: Women and Scholarship in Britain 1702-1870: A Reader edited by Felicia Gordon and Gina Luria Walker is an important collection of the early written scholarship composed by women in Britain printed by Broadview press. It represents the wish that Virginia Woolf had in her A Room of One’s Own: “Therefore I would ask […]

Outsiders Still: Why Women Journalists Love and Leave Their Newspaper Careers by Vivian Smith.

The book Outsiders Still: Why Women Journalists Love and Leave their Newspaper Careers is a 2015 book by Vivian Smith that explores the experiences of women in the newspaper medium and how their contributions and possibilities have been shaped by gender politics of the time in which they work alongside technological developments. Smith considers the […]

Sapphic Fathers:Discourses of Same Sex Desire From Nineteenth Century France by Gretchen Schultz

Gretchen Schultz’s new book is an important work on the meeting between French literary representations and lived identity, in the case of LGBT women during history, and pushes the argument that the tropes and themes that women’s variant sexualities were understood with during the past were often influenced by overwhelming male writers within fiction and […]

The Lives of Girls and Women from the Islamic World in Early Modern British Literature and Culture by Bernadette Andrea

Bernadette Andrea’s historical text The Lives of Girls and Women from the Islamic World in Early Modern British Literature and Culture traces it back to explore the lives of various Muslim women who came to Britain from the Medieval period onwards, either willingly or unwillingly to see how these early women were changed by and changed the lands they came to.

We Are GWL: Kathryn, Katie and Niamh

Kathryn, Katie and Niamh are all part of the team. Find out more about what they do, what they enjoy (and don’t enjoy so much) about Glasgow Women’s Library.