Book of the Month

Our volunteers and staff recommend… Book Picnic of the month

What a great way to welcome autumn and October with our monthly Book Picnic. Here are the books recommended on Wednesday 3rd October. It was funny to notice that most of the covers of the books brought were related to birds and feathers.   Pauline recommends: Mrs Pankhurst’s Purple Feather by Tessa Boase A fascinating and […]

Queer: A Graphic History by Meg-John Barker and Julia Scheele.

Queer: A Graphic History, is a book by cartoonist Julia Scheele and Activist-Academic Meg-John Barker. It is both complex and simple, informative and questioning, funny and deep. It even manages to make those like theorists Michel Foucault and Judith Butler easy to understand if you’ve struggled in the past to get by their terminology!

Menna Elfyn’s Bondo, Antonella Anedda’s Archipelago and Tatiana Shcherbina’s Life Without: Bilingual Poetry.

“Every act of communication is a miracle of translation.” 
― Ken Liu, The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories
Bloodaxe’s billingual poetry collections like Menna Elfyn’s Bondo, Antonella Anedda’s Archipelago and Tatiana Shcherbina’s Life Without  are works of wonder. Here is why you should give them a read.

Burned At The Stake-The Life of Mary Channing/The Yorkshire Witch-The Life and Trial of Mary Bateman by Summer Strevens.

The stories of Mary Channing and Mary Bateman are ones that have been silenced for hundreds of years. In these two fantastic biographies, Summer Strevens composes the first studies into both women since the post-execution salacious biographies used to tarnish and punish even their memory.

Our volunteers and staff recommend…

Our most recent Book Picnic took place on Friday 20th and as usual was filled with exciting new recommendations.

Rational Passions: Women and Scholarship in Britain 1702-1870: A Reader edited by Felicia Gordon and Gina Luria Walker

Rational Passions: Women and Scholarship in Britain 1702-1870: A Reader edited by Felicia Gordon and Gina Luria Walker is an important collection of the early written scholarship composed by women in Britain printed by Broadview press. It represents the wish that Virginia Woolf had in her A Room of One’s Own: “Therefore I would ask […]

Outsiders Still: Why Women Journalists Love and Leave Their Newspaper Careers by Vivian Smith.

The book Outsiders Still: Why Women Journalists Love and Leave their Newspaper Careers is a 2015 book by Vivian Smith that explores the experiences of women in the newspaper medium and how their contributions and possibilities have been shaped by gender politics of the time in which they work alongside technological developments. Smith considers the […]

Thoughts on Brand New Ancients

Kate Tempest’s Brand New Ancients pushes the idea of what poetry can be, telling a complete story through verse rather than serving as a collection of individual poems. It’s the kind of story that deserves to be read all in one go, preferably with tea, and lose yourself into the world of these characters whose lives intersect in ways that are recognisable to the reader.

Thoughts on The Hate U Give

Inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement, Angie Thomas’ The Hate U Give tells the story of Starr, who witnesses her innocent best friend Khalil being shot wrongfully by police in her home of the “ghetto” of Garden Heights, and how she struggles to find her identity between her home and the suburban high school she attends. It describes how she handles her grief and how she deals with the legal enquiry to his death as the only witness to the incident.

Thoughts on Fangirl

Rainbow Rowell’s Fangirl tells the story of Cath and Wren, identical twin sisters who, until college, have shared everything together. Wren chooses the stereotypical college experience – parties, boys, and dancing – whereas Cath sees herself more as “the kind of girl who fantasizes about being trapped in a library overnight”.